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Published on June 12th, 2013 | by Amy Edwards

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Job Seekers: It’s All About The Details!!

By Amy @BubbleJobs

It’s a fact of life; details matter! Whether it’s planning a wedding, designing a website or decorating a house; it’s the little details that really make all the difference and it’s the details that can take something from being just ‘average’ to a thing of real beauty and value – and the same goes for job applications!

When it comes to job applications, specific details can mean the difference between being shortlisted and being overlooked. Yes, it’s important to get the structure and basic content right – but, like I said, it’s the details that are the real icing on the cake and the thing that’s really going to catch a potential employer’s eye.

Hmm, OK so what kind of details are we actually talking about? First up, it’s the basics; spelling and grammar. You might not be applying for a copywriter job, but that doesn’t mean that employers don’t care about your basic writing skills! Basic spelling and grammar are important to any employer – and if you make a simple mistake on your CV or cover letter, you’re just giving them a reason to discount you. Come on now – thanks to Word, you have no excuse! Your cover letter and CV profile should flow smoothly and (here’s the important bit!) make sense – if in doubt, read it out loud!

detailsNext up, it’s context. Now, I’ve said it before and I’m sure I’ll say it again – it’s all about making your CV and cover letter relevant to the job you’re applying for! Applying for a social media job? Then it’s a good idea to make sure you include the words ‘social media’ somewhere on your CV and cover letter – this one might sound a bit obvious but you’d be surprised at how often we see this one. Remember, it’s your job to put your CV and cover letter in context to the role – if you do this, you’re making it ten times easier for the employer to shortlist you.

In third place, it’s something which I’m sure none of you will ever have to worry about but I’ll say it anyway – edit notes. You know when you asked someone to review your CV and they sent it back to you with lots of little notes attached? As helpful as these were, they’re for your eyes only – be sure to remove all of these before you send your CV across to a potential employer! Again, this sounds obvious but I’ve seen it done – and it’s a great way for pointing out all the problems with your CV! D’oh!

In fourth place, it’s name checking! Employers want to know you’ve read the job ad and you know what job you’re applying for so you need to show this in your cover letter! Like I mentioned in last week’s blog, it’s a good idea to specify which role you’re applying for and with whom in your cover letter – by failing to do this, you’re potentially taking yourself out of the running because there’s no evidence you’ve created the cover letter specifically for the role in question.

Anything else? Well, it goes without saying but you need to ensure your contact details are up to date and you’ve made it as easy as possible for a potential employer to hire you. If you’re applying for jobs in the digital industry, it’s probably a good idea to include links to your social media profiles (particularly if you’re applying for a social media vacancy!) as most employers would expect candidates to have some familiarity with social networks – and if you have your own blog, include a link to that too!

Remember, they might not seem like much on the face of it – but the small details really do count and can make all the difference between securing the job and getting yet another ‘no’! Good luck!! :)

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About the Author

Amy Edwards is the DIgital Marketing Manager for Bubble Jobs. With a strong background in online content and copywriting, Amy is responsible for the SEO, Content Management, Email Marketing, Banner Advertising and Online Partnerships for Bubble Jobs, the Bubble Jobs Blog and The Bubble Digital Career Portal. You can follow her on Twitter here or add her to your circles on Google+ here.



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